SUNY Stony Brook: Performing at a medical school Christmas party, December 1985

A Dada Boom: Stephan Mayer, Paige van Antwerp and Russil Tamsen, Providence, RI, Spring 1983


Stephan Mayer, MD, FCCM


Bass Guitar

Lead vocals


Dr. Mayer is Professor of Neurology and Neurological Surgery at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City, and is Director of Neurocritical Care for the Mount Sinai Health System. He is a graduate of Brown University, received his medical degree from Cornell University Medical College in New York, and did his postgraduate medical training in neurology and neurological intensive care at the Neurological Institute of New York.

Dr. Mayer is a world leader in the field of neurological intensive care. He has published more than 500 journal articles, books, case reports, book chapters, and abstracts. He was principal investigator of the NovoSeven ICH Trial, a worldwide multicenter clinical trial evaluating ultra-early hemsotatic therapy for brain hemorrhage, and served as principal investigator of the NIH-funded New York Presbyterian Neurological Emergencies Treatment Trials Network before coming to Mount Sinai. Dr. Mayer is also active in research related to therapeutic hypothermia, neurocardiac injury, status epilepticus, and cerebral blood flow moniutoring. He is the recipient of many awards, including an American Heart Association Lifesaver Award in 2014.

Dr. Mayer is a founding member of the Neurocritical Care Society, and is associate editor of the journal Neurocritical Care. He is a co-author of several textbooks, including Therapeutic Hypothermia and Neurological and Neurosurgical Intensive Care, which is considered the standard text in the field. His work as a neurointensivist was also recently profiled in the book Back From the Brink which describes how technological advances in intensive care medicine have led to dramatic improvements in outcome after brain injury.

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Equipment:

1980 Fender Precision bass

Hartke G15 bass amplifier

TASCAM CD-BT1-MKII Bass Trainer